Paro

The Paro Valley is one of the most populated areas in the country. This beautiful valley encapsulates a rich culture, scenic beauty and hundreds of myths and legends. Paro was also historically the centre of two of the most important trade routes to Tibet.
Mount Jomolhari also called Mountain of Goddess (7300m) reigns in white glory at the northern end of the valley. Its glacial waters plunge through deep gorges to form the Pa Chu (Paro River).


MAIN ATTRACTIONS OF PARO:
Paro International Airport
Paro Airport is the only international airport of Bhutan. The airport is located six kilometres away from Paro and sits at an altitude of 2200 meters. With surrounding peaks as high as 5500 meters, it is considered to be "one of the world's most challenging airports". Indeed, flights at Paro are allowed under visual meteorological conditions only and are restricted to daylight hours (sunrise to sunset).
Rinpung Dzong
The elegant and perfectly symmetrical Rinpung Dzong looks after the religious and secular activities in the valley. Located on the hill over looking both sides of the valley, this dzong was historically one of Bhutan's strongest and most strategic fortresses.
National Museum
Behind the Rinpung Dzong, on a high hillside, is the castle shaped Ta Dzong, a watch tower built in 1651 to defend Bhutan from the Tibetan invasions. Since 1967, this Dzong houses the National Museum full of murals, numismatics, philately, etc...
Taktsang Monastery - Tiger’s Nest
Taktsang Monastery is a prominent Buddhist Monastery located in the cliffside of the upper valley of Paro. The place is highly sacred to the Bhutanese who believe that, in 8th Century, Guru Padma Sambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, the father of Bhutanese Buddhism landed here on the back of a tiger and stayed three months for meditation.
Drugyel Dzong
Eighteen kilometres from Paro is the burnt ruins of Drugyel Dzong (victorious fortress) from where Tibetan invasions were repelled. On a clear day one can get a view of Mount Jomolhari from here.